The Inspiration Behind Pattern of Shadows

Glen Mill was the inspiration for the first of my trilogy: Pattern of Shadows. Glen Mill was one of the first two POW camps to be opened in Britain. A disused cotton mill built in 1903 it ceased production in 1938. At a time when all-purpose built camps were being used by the armed forces and there was no money available for POW build, Glen Mill was chosen for various reasons: it wasn’t near any military installations or seaports and it was far from the south and east of Britain, it was large and it was enclosed by a railway, a road and two mill reservoirs.

The earliest occupants were German merchant seamen caught in Allied ports at the outbreak of war and brought from the Interrogation centre of London. Within months Russian volunteers who had been captured fighting for the Germans in France were brought there as well. According to records they were badly behaved, ill-disciplined and – oddly enough, I thought – hated the Germans more than they did the British. So there were lots of fights. But, when German paratroopers (a branch of the Luftwaffe) arrived they imposed a Nazi-type regime within the camp and controlled the Russians.

Later in the war the prisoners elected a Lagerführer; a camp leader. This hierarchy ruled the inner workings of the camp and the camp commanders had to deal with them.

 

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The more I read about Glen Mill the more I thought about the total bleakness of it and the lives of the men there.  And I knew I wanted to write about that. But I also wanted there to be hope somewhere. I wanted to imagine that something good could have come out of the situation the men were in.

 

And that’s where Pattern of Shadows came in. Pattern of Shadows was published  by Honno in 2010

posbook

Reading about the history of Glen Mill as a German POW camp in Oldham brought back a personal memory of my childhood.

In the nineteen fifties and sixties my parents worked in the local cotton mill.

My mother was a winder (working on a machine that transferred the cotton off large cones onto small reels (bobbins), in order for the weavers to use to make the cloth). Well before the days of Health and Safety I would often go to wait for her to finish work on my way home from school. I remember the muffled boom of noise as I walked across the yard and the sudden clatter of so many different machines as I stepped through a small door cut into a great wooden door. I remember the rumble of the wheels as I watched men pushing great skips filled with cones alongside the winding frames, or manoeuvring trolleys carrying rolls of material. I remember the women singing and shouting above the noise, whistling for more bobbins: the colours of the cotton and cloth – so bright and intricate. But above all I remember the smell: of oil, grease – and in the storage area – the lovely smell of the new material stored in bales and the feel of the cloth against my legs when I sat on them, reading until the siren hooted, announcing the end of the shift.

1950s Lancashire Cotton Mill

When I thought about Glen Mill I wondered what kind of signal would have been used to separate parts of the day for all those men imprisoned there. I realised how different their days must have been from my memories of a mill. 

Pattern of Shadows has been on #kindle summer sales and #kindledailydeals in 2014. It is also featured in my interview on 27th November on #MysteryNovember

The sequel to Pattern of Shadows: Changing Patterns, was published by Honno in  2013

The sequel to: Pattern of Shadows

The sequel to:
Pattern of Shadows

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Changing-Patterns-Judith-Barrow/dp/1906784396/ref=tmm_pap_title_0

 http://www.amazon.co.uk/Pattern-Shadows-Judith-Barrow/dp/1906784051/ref=tmm_pap_title_0

 The last of the trilogy: Living in the Shadows will be published by Hanno (http://www.honno.co.uk/) in 2015

med full colour honno logo

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16 thoughts on “The Inspiration Behind Pattern of Shadows

  1. Pingback: Today #guestauthor @barrow_judith. Local history, stories with heart and memories of times past but not gone. | Just Olga

  2. Pingback: Woman of the week: Judith Barrow and her new release: Living in the Shadows | writerchristophfischer

  3. Pingback: Reviews: Living in the Shadows by Judith Barrow | writerchristophfischer

  4. I enjoyed reading about the inspiration behind Pattern of Shadows, (a book I very much enjoyed). I lived in Blackburn for about ten years and learned a bit about the history of the mills. Also, my dad, as a young soldier, was for a time stationed at a POW camp but it was in Scotland and seemed (from what he said) to have been much less bleak than Glen Mill. He told me stories about some of the wonderful craft work the POWs did with wood, building model villages.

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