Lindisfarne (Project Renova Book 2) #postapocalyptic by Terry Tyler #TuesdayBookBlog

Lindisfarne (Project Renova Book 2) by [Tyler, Terry]

I was given an ARC of Lindisfarne by the author in return for an honest review.

 I gave this book 5*out of 5*

Book Description::

Six months after the viral outbreak, civilised society in the UK has broken down. Vicky and her group travel to the Northumbrian island of Lindisfarne, where they are welcomed by an existing community. 

New relationships are formed, old ones renewed. The lucky survivors adapt, finding strength they didn’t know they possessed, but the honeymoon period does not last long. Some cannot accept that the rules have changed, and, for just a few, the opportunity to seize power is too great to pass up. Egos clash, and the islanders soon discover that there are greater dangers than not having enough to eat.

Meanwhile, in the south, Brian Doyle discovers that rebuilding is taking place in the middle of the devastated countryside. He comes face to face with Alex Verlander from Renova Workforce Liaison, who makes him an offer he can’t refuse. But is UK 2.0 a world in which he will want to live?

My Review:

I have been an admirer of Terry Tyler’s work for a long time; I like her style of writing,  I  like the way she builds her characters and her sense of place in all her novels.

I’ve read the first of the Project Renova Book Series: Tipping Point. And, although, this genre is not usually my first choice, I read it purely because it was written by this author. I wasn’t disappointed. Here’s my review: http://bit.ly/2um9Fcq.   And I enjoyed my interview with Terry Tyler: http://bit.ly/2uzbsef.

When I started LIndisfarne I was anxious to learn what had happened to the characters in Tipping Point. But also I wondered if the story would be as strong as in the first book.

It was. It is.

I don’t give spoilers (if I can help it) in my reviews so here are my thoughts:

I love the way the story is told; each chapter is given over to individual characters. Not only do we see situations through their perspective, we learn – through their voice/their internal dialogue – about them. And we also see the actions of the other characters from their points of view, and their opinions on that action. It gives so many extra layers to the plot at different times.

There is one exception to this style of writing; the chapters around a character called Wedge. Thoroughly evil chap. His part in the book is told from the third person point of view.I liked this; it distances the reader from him yet we still know what he’s thinking, hear his internal dialogue… follow his actions. I’ll say no more.

The author brings the characters to life through their actions and mannerisms but one of her greatest strengths is through their  dialogue; each character has their own way of speaking.There was no doubt whose voice I was reading even without dialogue tags. I especially enjoyed  reading Lottie’s chapters; the sense of how she’s grown from a young teenager in the first book to young adult in this one is fascinating … and all in eighteen months.

I always say that this author has a knack for descriptions. Lindisfarne is no exception. The beauty of the island parallels the destruction of the mainland and the building of UK2. I could picture each setting as the characters moved around in them.

General thoughts: 

There is one story line that I had an uneasy feeling about – when my fears were realised I felt that satisfaction a reader gets when they think something will happen and it does but also a great sadness that it has. To get that connection with any character shows strong writing on the part of the author

There is also another intriguing sub plot line threaded throughout that follows one of the  characters from Tipping Point: Doyle. I have a feeling we will hear a lot more of him in Book 3.

I said at the beginning of this review that I have always loved this author’s work but, for me, this is Terry Tyler’s best novel yet; strong characters, strong dialogue, strongest writing, strongest plot; so I can’t recommend it highly enough. But I would advise reading Tipping Point first. This is a  trilogy (looking forward to the last! book). 

Hmm, having read and reviewed as constructively as I could, I’ve realised I have extolled all the virtues of Lindisfarne without any negative or any ‘to think about’ points. I do have one; I would love to see these books in real life book shops – the covers alone would make them stand out. Any chance?

 Author Biography:Terry Tyler

Terry Tyler is the author of fifteen books on Amazon, the latest being ‘Tipping Point’, the first book in her new post apocalyptic series. She is proud to be self-published, is an avid reader and book reviewer, and a member of Rosie Amber’s Book Review Team.

Terry is a Walking Dead addict, and writes for one of their main fansites. She lives in the north east of England with her husband, and is still trying to learn Geordie

 Terry’s links:

Twitter: https://twitter.com/TerryTyler4

Goodreads: http://bit.ly/2xLJRa6

Blog: http://terrytyler59.blogspot.co.uk/

Buying links:

 Amazon.co.uk: http://amzn.to/2fpUAfG

 Amazon.com: http://amzn.to/2xLVxcI

 

 

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Interviewing One of my Favourite Authors; Terry Tyler and Introducing her Latest Novel, Tipping Point: #SundayBlogShare

Kings And QueensThe House Of YorkLast ChildThe Devil You Know11 aa aa aa Lind

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Terry-Tyler/e/B00693EGKM

 

Hi Terry, good to see you here today. Please tell us first,what is the ultimate goal you hope to achieve with your writing?

To write something so amazingly good I can’t believe I’ve written it.  I doubt that will ever happen, though; even if it did, I’d probably still spend half my time thinking it was rubbish.  Maybe there never is an ultimate goal with anything creative, as there is always more, a different direction in which to progress.  You never get to a point when you think, ‘right, I’ve done it, I’ve got there, so I’ll stop’.

Are your characters based on real people or did they all come entirely from your imagination?

People often ask writers, ‘is your main character supposed to be Joe/Bob/Steve?’  But he rarely is; writers make stuff up.  That’s what we do.  Experience fuels the imagination, that’s all; I’d say my characters are 80% my invention, 20% taken from real life.

What is your work schedule like when you’re writing?

I write on every day that it’s possible to do so.  Aside from family commitments, anything else has to fit round it.  I give myself deadlines for completing each draft, just because I work better that way.  When the book’s gone to my proofreader, I catch up on stuff I need to do (guest blog posts, emails, etc), and kid myself I’m going to do some jobs around the house.  However, I’ve always got the next book waiting in the wings (ie, my head!) and so the process begins again, and the bedroom remains unpainted.

What do you think makes a good story?

An opening chapter with threads that make you eager to know what’s going to happen.  Characters that jump off the page and into your thoughts; if you don’t care what happens to them, you have no impetus to keep reading.  A feasible plot, with unexpected developments that don’t seem as if they’re just there for the sake of making ‘plot twists that will blow your socks off’ claims on Amazon.  Resolution for each aspect of the story (unless part of a series).  An ending that stays with you after you’ve read it.

How many books have you written? Which is your favourite?

Twenty-five (I think).  Fourteen of them are published, with another finished and in the preparation process (Lindisfarne, which may be out by the time this post appears!).  I can’t name one favourite, but I have special affection for the most recent, Tipping Point and sequel Lindisfarne, because they’re part of a series, which I think about all the time!  My other favourites are The House of York and Last Child, family sagas inspired by events during Tudor and Plantagenet times.

Could you tell us a bit about your most recent book and why it is a must-read?

I would never describe my own book as a ‘must-read’; that’s for the reader to say, not me!  The Project Renova series, of which Tipping Point is the first book, is about a global pandemic, and also, initially, about how public opinion is manipulated by the media.

I’ve wanted to write about life after the collapse of 21st century civilisation for ages, because I’m a bit obsessed with all things post apocalyptic, but I wanted to ‘keep it real’, as much as possible.  Vicky is an ordinary woman living in a small town, with a teenage daughter, Lottie.  As Vicky says: ‘How to manage without flushing loos is never mentioned in TV shows or films about life after global disasters.  I suppose viewers don’t want to see their favourite hunky road warrior sidling off into the woods with a roll of Andrex.’

Does your book have a lesson? Moral?

  1. Nothing you say on the internet is private. 3.  When the going gets tough, people’s true selves come to the fore.  No moral lessons, though.  I don’t think.

Do your characters seem to hijack the story or do you feel like you have the reins of the story?

It’s your imagination, your fingers on the keys.  Sometimes a character will turn out differently from how you intended, mostly because unexpected ideas about how to develop the character appear while you’re writing, but it’s still you in the driving seat.  I don’t go in for all this ‘I wanted to make Sebastian a modest shopkeeper, but he just wasn’t having it!’ stuff.

When did you write your first book and how old were you?

I first wrote a novel in 1993, when I was thirty-four.  I might get it out and have a cringe-athon some time.

Do you have any hidden or uncommon talents?

If I have, I can’t think what they are.  Or maybe I’m just not telling you.  Smiley face with wink.

What would you say is your interesting writing quirk?

I haven’t got one.  I’m not that interesting.  I just sit down at my desk and get on with it.

What do you like to do when you’re not writing?

Oh dear, this is where I’m supposed to reveal all my fascinating and unusual hobbies, isn’t it?  Thing is, I mostly just write, and when I’m not, I do the same relaxation/leisure time stuff as most people.   You know, watch stuff, read, go for walks, clean the house.  Okay, I’m lying about the last one.  I read a lot and review books on my book blog, and for Rosie Amber’s Book Review Blog.

Give us a random fact about yourself.

I’ve recently become a vegan.  It’s difficult, but at least it stops me raiding the biscuit tin.  I can see myself eating vegetable stir fry with Quorn for dinner every night; I’m not very interested in cooking.

Terry Tyler is the author of fourteen books on Amazon, the latest being ‘Tipping Point’, the first book in her new post apocalyptic series.  She is proud to be self-published, is an avid reader and book reviewer, and a member of Rosie Amber’s Book Review Team.

Her next book, ‘Lindisfarne’, the sequel to ‘Tipping Point’, should be available in September 2017.  She lives in the north east of England with her husband, and is still trying to learn Geordie

terry

Books coming out in 2017:

Tipping Point, released on August 7th.  Post apocalyptic/government conspiracy/family drama.

Lindisfarne, to be realised in September 2017.  Sequel to Tipping Point.  Also Romantic Suspense

Patient Zero, hopefully ready to publish in December 2017.  Outtake short stories   related to Tipping Point, Lindisfarne and Book 3 of the series, yet to be written.

Thought I might add my own review Of Tipping Point here:Tipping Point

Links:

My Review of Tipping Point by Terry Tyler #FridayReads

11 AA AA Amazon (1)

 

I was given an ARC of Tipping Point by the author in return for an honest review.

 I gave this book 5* out of 5*

Book Description:

‘I didn’t know danger was floating behind us on the breeze as we walked along the beach, seeping in through the windows of our picture postcard life.’

The year is 2024. A new social networking site bursts onto the scene. Private Life promises total privacy, with freebies and financial incentives for all. Across the world, a record number of users sign up.

A deadly virus is discovered in a little known African province, and it’s spreading—fast. The UK announces a countrywide vaccination programme. Members of underground group Unicorn believe the disease to be man-made, and that the people are being fed lies driven by a vast conspiracy.

Vicky Keating’s boyfriend, Dex, is working for Unicorn over two hundred miles away when the first UK outbreak is detected in her home town of Shipden, on the Norfolk coast. The town is placed under military controlled quarantine and, despite official assurances that there is no need for panic, within days the virus is unstoppable.

In London, Travis begins to question the nature of the top secret data analysis project he is working on, while in Newcastle there are scores to be settled…

This is the first book in the Project Renova series; the second, Lindisfarne, is due to be published in September 2017, with the final instalment in the middle of 2018. A collection of outtake short stories, Patient Zero, is in progress, and should be available around December 2017. 

My Review:

I need to say right from the start that a dystopian novel is one genre I have never read. And never intended to.

But then I heard that one of my favourite authors, Terry Tyler, had written such a book and couldn’t resist asking for a copy.  I was relying on the fact that, whatever kind of book she produces, this author always has believable characters, great narration, can build a great sense of place and writes dialogue any reader can believe in.

 I wasn’t disappointed. True, it’s a tough subject (I really am a wimp about ‘end of the world as we know it’ stories. but Tipping Point is a truly good read. It’s obvious the author has researched the reasons, the politics, the societal differences and  effects of a complete breakdown  of a country. The gradual disintegration of Shipden and the UK as a whole is utterly  convincing.

But it’s not only the plot that is well thought out. As usual Terry Tyler has produced well rounded, multi-layered characters. There are the ones to admire, to fear, to despise and to empathise with. The reactions of  the protagonist, Vicky, to what is happening is credible, her actions plausible. I liked her; I liked her reasoning, her relationship with her daughter, Lottie, her courage (although she believes herself to be weak). Most of all I like that she grows in strength of character through all the turmoil she faces (and especially that she begins to believe in herself and not to just take the word of her errant boyfriend, Dex) And , in contrast, I would like to mention someone else, Billy Stokes; a flat character but one that chilled me with his singular perspective, and is a prime example of the kind of  person that those behind Private Life, a new social networking site, aim their propaganda towards. There is one small scene where, with his actions he takes centre stage and foreshadows a devastating sceario. It’s scary!!

And. as always the dialogue, both internal and spoken, portrays the personalities of every character in the book…and, believe me, there are some weird and extreme characters. But there again, I should think such a situation would bring out the most base, and basic, traits in anyone.

The graphic descriptions of settings the details of the deserted towns and countryside feel incredibly authentic; much as I would imagine them to be. It’s easy to envisage the people moving around these places.

 I was actually disappointed when I reached the end of Tipping Point; having believed that there would be some reassurance that all would be well for the characters (but probably that’s just me wanting a happy ending! Yes, the world has been destroyed but let’s just make another, less corrupt, more pleasant; one for everyone left…who, of course, will only be the ‘nice’ characters.). But there’s no such reassurance; things seem to be working out but then comes the great spanner in the works (I’ll leave you to find out what… because, of course, unlike me, you won’t be expecting a perfectly ‘sorted out’ denouement, will you? When I reached the end there were still so many unanswered questions; so much unresolved. 

 Terry Tyler has indeed produced a disturbing story. But it’s brilliantly written and it’s threaded through with hope and optimism; belief in the strengths of the human race. Nevertheless, I doubt I will ever be a true fan of dystopian novels… except the next one of the Project Renova series. As the author tells us, Lindisfarne, is  to be published in September 2017. I know I’ll be ordering that… and the final one.

 After that, unless Terry Tyler decides to stick to this genre, I ‘ll leave dystopian novels to other readers. But this one I can certainly recommend.

To be published 7th August – so not long to wait.