Tenby Arts Festival 2016: Day One: Saturday 24th

instruments_flat_transimages

Brass Ensemble

To announce the opening of the festival with a swing, a brass ensemble will perform a medley of popular musical numbers.

Outside St Mary’s Church
High Street

11am

Free


 

Book Fair                               11998866_10152946036952132_7601875809175322308_n

For the fifth year running the Book Fair is the popular opening event in Church House for the Tenby Arts Festival. We will have twenty-eight authors and two publishers for all to chat with, who are either Welsh based or have set their books in Wal12049533_502977976546241_4653897117982364739_nes. There will be three competitions this time: an adults short story competition, one for teenagers and one for children. Details to be announced separately in May through the media.
Talks, books, relaxing music, refreshments; a morning of friendly chatter and discussion – a great morning for all.

Here is what a visitor said of last year’s fair (see picture):

“This weekend I’ve attended the Book Fair at the Tenby Arts Festival. Having seen the busy London Book Fair last year and on the other end of the spectrum some deserted halls with only two tables and four attendees elsewhere, I was pleasantly surprised to find a good vibe and a great buzz in a busy hall with lots of mingling and literary delights.”

Church House
11am – 3pm

Free


 

Sand Circles

Marc Treanor

Rhydygors.jpg.opt390x222o0,0s390x222

DSC_0804.jpg.opt390x588o0,0s390x588

 

 

 

 

 

The essence of all you see, only exists because of a very profound order of certain repeating mathematical formulas that create the foundation of all matter, from atoms to galaxies. Sacred Geometry is the ancient science that explores and explains the energy patterns that create and unify all things, and reveals the precise way that the energy of Creation organises itself. On every scale, every natural pattern of growth or movement conforms inevitably to one or more of these geometric shapes. The strands of our DNA, the cornea of our eye, snow flakes, pine cones, flower petals, diamond crystals, the branching of trees, the path of lightning, a nautilus shell, the star we spin around, the galaxy we spiral within, and all life forms as we know them emerge out of timeless geometric codes. Sacred Geometry may very well provide the answers that you have been looking for.  (http://www.maya48.com/)

The patterns Marc creates on the beaches are all inspired by sacred geometry. The idea of ‘sacredness’ transpires from the  realisation that these patterns appear everywhere from the very small, the quantum field or the microcosm, to the very large, the cosmic realms or the macrocosm.

North Beach

Free

 

Jack Harris                          Jack Harris

Jack Harris writes and performs literate, compassionate songs, about subjects as disparate as Caribbean drinking festivals, the colour of a potato flower and the lives of great poets like Sylvia Plath and Elizabeth Bishop.
These have won him considerable acclaim. The Telegraph voted his album ‘The Flame and the Pelican’ #5 in their top 10 Roots/Folk albums of 2012. Q magazine praised his ‘unique lyrical mind’, and Maverick UK awarded the record its full 10/10 rating.
Jack is happiest when playing live. He has brought his music to a loyal, ever-growing audience, at festivals, venues and skating rinks across the world. On occasion he has opened for some of Folk’s biggest names, including Anais Mitchell, Cara Dillon and Dick Gaughan. His live show is a riveting mix of song craft and theatrical story-telling, delivered with warm voice, dry humour and nimble, string-picking fingers. Come on out and see.

Church House
8.00pm

£10

 


 

Cantemus

The Messiah

UnknownScreen Shot 2015-05-14 at 11.48.31

Under the baton of Welsh National Opera chorus master, Alexander Martin, singers from all over Pembrokeshire and beyond, choir members or not will rehearse and perform Handel’s Messiah  in the beautiful surroundings of St Mary’s Church.

Born in London, Alexander Martin studied Music at St John’s College, Cambridge, and the piano at the Royal College of Music in London. In 1992 he was appointed répétiteur at the Opéra National de Lyon in France under Kent Nagano. From 1995 to 1998 Alexander spent four seasons in Germany as répétiteur at the Opera, and répétiteur and conductor at the Hesse State Opera in Wiesbaden, before returning to live in France to pursue a freelance career. He has worked as guest conductor, assistant and coach for Lyon, Marseille, Avignon, le Capitole Toulouse, l’Opéra National du Rhin (Britten’s The Rape of Lucretia), La Monnaie, le Grand Théâtre Geneva, as well as for Aix-en-Provence, Glyndebourne, and Montepulciano Festivals. Alexander also worked closely with Philippe Jordan Britten’s Peter Grimes and The Turn of the Screw (Graz), and collaborated with René Jacobs in Rome for Tancredi. Following three seasons as Chorus Master in Bern (where he also conducted Cendrillon and Dave Maric’s Ghosts), Alexander worked as Chorus Master at the Opéra National de Bordeaux from 2010-2014. During this time he also worked in Bayreuth with Philippe Jordan on Parsifal (2012). He became Chorus Master at WNO at the start of this season.

The choir will be accompanied by Jeff Howard, organist.

Jeffrey Howard was born in Cardiff and studied at the University of Wales College, Cardiff, and the Royal Academy of Music, specializing in organ performance and church music. Since graduating, he has pursued a freelance career as organist, pianist, singer, coach and conductor. He has accompanied leading international singers including Bryn Terfel, Sir Willard White, and, Rebecca Evans.

Jeff has performed throughout the United Kingdom and Europe including the Wigmore Hall, The Goethe Institute, Brussels, and St. Paul’s Cathedral, and has worked with orchestras such as The Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, and the Royal Philharmonic. He made his Royal Albert Hall debut in 2002 as soloist in Shostakovitch’s second piano concerto. Recent performance include performed Rachmaninov’s second piano concerto and Beethoven’s Emperor Concerto at St. David’s Hall, Cardiff with the Cardiff Philharmonic Orchestra and a recital with Bryn Terfel at Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool.

Jeff frequently provides arrangements for the BBC National Orchestra and Chorus of Wales, S4C and various solo artists. He is accompanist, singer and arranger for Only Men Aloud!, winners of the BBC competition ‘Last Choir Standing’ who recently won a Classical Brit Award for their second album on the Universal label. Jeff is also involved in cabaret and music theatre having worked with names such as Michael Ball, David Owen Jones, Peter Karrie, and more informally, Dame Shirley Bassey!

For the past 18 years, Jeffrey has held a post as vocal coach at the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama and at Welsh National Opera and Welsh National Youth Opera.

For those wishing to join the choir there will be rehearsal before the performance during the day. There will be a charge of £10 for those taking part and in addition a refundable deposit for copies of the music/text.

St. Mary’s Church

Rehearsals will be at 3pm – 5.30pm
Performance 6.30pm – 8pm

Tickets £8 


 

 


 

Enquiries to: tenbyartsfestival@yahoo.co.uk

Advertisements

Brexitania (or Alan in Wonderland) by Alan A Roberts.   

Another gem from Alan Roberts, student of one of my creative writing classes. His last post was  here: http://bit.ly/29u7vui.  And then there was:  http://bit.ly/20Gvbh6 where he battles with the self service supermarket check-out

Here Alan finds himself in yet another quandary. But somehow he has returned to being a young lad. Well, with Alan, anything can happen… as we well know! 

alan in wonderland

Cleaning his large bedroom frustrated Alan and he lacked concentration, making the task long and boring.  His mind wandered until noticing the dust-laden air being sucked towards the bottom of the wall alongside the old wardrobe.  Perplexed he investigated, holding his hand near the wall feeling the air going in, slightly yet in.  He held his breath before deciding to gingerly peel away the wallpaper until a huge wrought iron door stood before him.  Where it might lead he couldn’t comprehend.

He lifted the handle, pushed the door, which opened slowly, its creaking hinges adding to Alan’s apprehension.  Although the inside was dark, he stepped timidly into the black void without considering where or what he had entered or whether he might get out again.  Powerful lights blazed into life but Alan had no time to think about stopping himself for he felt himself falling and whatever he had fallen into was either very deep or he was falling very slowly, for he had time to look about and wonder what might happen next.  He tried to look down but it was too dark to see what was below so he looked at the sides of the hole and noticed there were maps of European countries – in fact he counted twenty-seven maps and alongside each was a photograph.  Recognising the faces of Hollande and Merkel, Alan assumed every photo was of the Country’s political leader.  All poked their tongues out as he passed.

Down, down, down. 

interference-556111__180

He thought the fall would never end.  Suddenly, thump! thump! he landed upon a pile of papers.  His fall was over and amazingly he was unhurt.  As he steadied himself he saw the papers were hundreds of thousands of the recent referendum ballot papers, each marked with an X alongside the ‘Leave the European Union’ statement.  Alan looked up from where he had fallen but all was in darkness overhead.  In front of him was a long passage and from there he saw a White Rabbit hurrying toward him.  Alan couldn’t believe his eyes; the Rabbit’s white fur was unkempt and had the face of Boris Johnston.

alice-in-wonderland-297198__180

“Welcome, Alan,” the White Rabbit joyously proclaimed, “you’re our first visitor since the victory.”  He grabbed Alan’s hand and continued to shake it until Alan’s arm ached.

“Where am I?” Alan asked.

“Why my lad, you’re in Brexitania.  It’s the Country’s new name – Britain sounds too much like Brittany and we can’t have any confusion with them lot over the Channel.  Do you like the new name?”

“It sounds stupid”, Alan responded.

“Sorry old boy, can’t change it now – registered it with the Copyright Office straight away.  Anyway, tell me what brings you here?”

“I found a secret door in my bedroom then fell into a hole that seemed to go on forever and landed here: I’ve no idea what’s happening.  It’s all a bit weird and a little exciting, if I’m honest.”

“Ah, that’s what we like to hear – yes – a bit weird and a little exciting – good combination of words – might put them in our manifesto when we get round to it,” Rabbit exclaimed.

White Rabbit struggled to pull a large pocket watch from a small pocket, looked at its face on which Alan noticed it had neither hands nor numbers and exclaimed,

“Oh my ears and whiskers, how late it’s getting! I have to be off to trigger article 50. We always knew Jean-Claude Junker would prove troublesome.  Anyway, follow me and meet the rest of the gang. This way, follow the path: hurry, there’s a good chap.”

Alan followed close behind but when he turned a corner marked, ‘Brexit Triumph’, the White Rabbit had disappeared.  He now found himself in a long, low hall that was lit by a row of lamps hanging from the roof.  There were doors round the hall, but all were locked; and when Alan had been all the way down one side and up the other, trying every one of the twenty-seven doors he walked sadly down the middle, wondering how he was ever to get out. Suddenly he came upon a little three-legged party table on which was placed a tiny golden key and Alan hoped it might unlock one of the doors; but as he tried each one their locks proved either too large or the key too small and none of them could be opened.  He tried a second time, hoping he might have missed one door on his initial round and he came to a low curtain that he hadn’t previously noticed.  Pulling the curtain aside he found a small door on which a sign declared, ‘BREXITANIA – ‘IN AND OUT’.  He tried the key and to his good fortune it fitted!

Opening the door, Alan found himself completely in the dark.  Adjusting his eyes, he saw two paths marked, ‘OUT’ and ‘IN’ but no instruction as to which of the two pathways should be taken or why.  He opted for the ‘IN’ path and walked its length, finally emerging into the light, into a place Alan recognised as Parliament Green.  He walked forward, becoming aware of a figure standing nearby, whose back was turned to him.  The figure wore a natty suit with a large stove-pipe hat perched precariously on its head.  As the figure turned he noticed a handwritten note pinned to the brim on which was printed in bold purple ink the words, ‘VOTE UKIP’.  Bizarrely, from beneath the rim the grinning face of Nigel Farage peered out; in his right hand he clutched a full pint of what Alan assumed to be froth-topped ale, which he instantly drank.  The Mad Hatter approached with his right hand extended.  Expecting to shake hands, Alan extended his but the Mad Hatter placed his thumb on his nose and wiggled his fingers, mockingly.

mad-28849__180

“That had you,” the Mad Hatter gleefully spluttered before continuing, “hope you haven’t come for your share of the three hundred and fifty million quid we said we’d share out.” Bit of a porky but it helped get us OUT.  So, welcome to Brexitania – White Rabbit says you just dropped in. If you need a drink I’ll get Mock Chancellor Osborne over there to get you a glass of his ‘grumpy’.  Sorry, couldn’t resist that; cloudy lemonade’s your tipple, I believe?”

Carrying his lemonade, Alan wandered into the crowd gathered on the far side of the Green. A resplendent footman told him that a Cheshire Cat was due to make a speech.  Alan decided to wait and a few moments later the Cheshire Cat with Michael Gove’s grinning face jumped onto the dais and began addressing those assembled.

stock-vector-fat-black-cat-cartoon-vector-image-244394905

“Welcome everybody – I’ve some announcements to make following our landslide victory.  First, Mr Justice Gums will be Lord Chancellor – boom! boom!; secondly we are banning the letters I and N appearing together and following Royal Assent words like ‘spin’ will become ‘spOUT’ and Cheshire Cat’s grin will become a ‘grOUT’; pubs called Inn’s will become OUT’s; legal terms will also change with Inns of Court becoming OUTS of Court and even Her Majesty’s family name will change from Windsor to WOUTdsor, difficult to pronounce but we’re certain you’ll get used to it.  Any questions?”

Alan raised his arm.

“And what’s your question, young man?”

“I can’t remain in such madness and I don’t want to be among all you mad people”.

Cheshire Cat Gove grinned from ear to ear.  “Oh no, you can’t REMAIN because we’re now OUT but also IN, if you get my drift. And anyway, we’re all mad here.  I’m mad, they’re mad and you’re mad.”

Alan indignantly responded, “You can’t say I’m mad, you don’t know me?”

“You must be mad,” grinned the Cheshire Cat, “or you wouldn’t have come here.” He paused for a moment, then continued, “No further questions? Then everybody OUT, quick as you can, there’s good fellows.”

Alan watched as Cheshire Cat jumped from the stage leaving behind his still wide grin.  From the Green he kept running until coming to a sign saying, ‘THIS WAY TO SEE ELIZABETH, QUEEN OF HEARTS’.  Alan took the path indicated and found himself standing outside a building resembling Buckingham Palace where a further sign proclaimed: ‘THE BREXITANIA GOVERNMENT GIVES NOTICE THAT BUCKINGHAM PALACE WILL BECOME BUCKOUTGHAM PALACE AND HRH THE DUKE OF EDINBURGH WILL BECOME THE DUKE OF EDOUTBURGH’.  Seeing another of the footmen, Alan asked if he might speak with the Queen.  With his request granted, Alan was ushered inside and approached the Royal couple seated on their thrones.  Alan thought they both looked decidedly sad although the Duke was making a valiant attempt to wave his EU flag, much to the annoyance of the courtiers.  The Queen wore a dress on which red hearts were sewn over its entire surface whilst the Duke had on his ceremonial uniform with plastic medals across the jacket, brown suede shoes and from his red tricorne hat a plume of feathers drooped over his face.  Alan forced himself not to laugh.  Advised to kneel before the Queen, announce his name loudly and tell Her Majesty why he needed the audience, Alan nervously approached the Queen’s throne, kneeled, cleared his throat and in a loud voice said:

queen

“Your Majesty, my name is Alan and I ask if you can please arrange for me to return home as soon as possible.”

The Duke looked down and simply muttered,

“Oh Gawd, not another bloody simpleton”.

The Queen, unfased by the Duke’s rude aside, looked over her bifocals,

“And where would one’s home be?”

Alan, stuck for a meaningful response, thought if he gave his address at 23 Alder Gardens the Queen would have no idea where that was or how he could get there, so answered,

“Back up the long hole, your Majesty.”

The ensuing momentary silence was broken when the Duke shouted,

“Back up whose long hole, you cheeky little bugger?”

“Off with his head,” the Queen commanded.  Attendants grabbed Alan and hauled him into a side-room where he was padlocked inside a small wooden cage.  Panicking, he closed his eyes to stop himself crying. He was, he thought, far too young to die.

Suddenly, loud knocking accompanied by his mother’s voice startled Alan back to the reality of his bedroom,

“Alan, Benny’s here and wants to know if you’re coming out?”

Staring at the ripped wallpaper, he wailed, “Mum, tell him I’m staying in,” and pulled the duvet over his head and thanked God he was safely back home.

sleeping-1159279__180

 

 

 

 

TENBY BOOK FAIR 2016 STORY COMPETITIONS

Well. it’s time to get those brain cells going again for the Tenby Book Fair Writing Competitions.

This year we have three Competitions for three different age groups.

 See all details below:

compleafletAcompleafletB

Method of payment for the Adult Story – Pay by the  Paypal button on the Tenby Book Fair Competition Page: http://bit.ly/28NxmQG… 

OR

Postal Entries to the address on the poster.

ROSIE’S BOOK REVIEW TEAM #RBRT

Rosie's Book Review team 1

My review of Broken Wings by Ian Welch

I’ve given this 3 out of 5 stars

24527006

First, I would like to thank Rosie Amber and Ian Welch for providing me this book so I may bring you this review.
Broken Wings has a huge plot-line that spans over many years. I’ll put my thoughts down in a different way than I normally do by giving the gist of the story:
Lawrence Cranston, the eldest son of a poor family who live in Portsmouth in England just after WW2, has died in mysterious explosion. The father, Edward, drinks. The mother, Isabel, is struggling to keep a roof over the family’s head. Edward becomes terminally ill. The scene is set for him to make some monumental changes that will provide for the family when he dies and will also settle an old score. After his death, and following a certain incident, Isabel makes drastic changes for herself and the rest of the family. They move to Los Angeles but trouble follows them in many guises. Eventually Isabel moves back to England to face her past.
I’ve said no more than is in the book description on Amazon.

Okay … this is a storyline that covers many years and it’s an interesting one. It’s easy to see that there has been a lot of research carried out to get the setting correct and give a sense of place, both to the houses and the towns and cities that the characters move around in. And there are enough descriptions dropped in to also give a sense of the era.
My main problem is that there is no even pace within the book; sometimes there is a great deal of time spent on scenes that, in my opinion, could be shorter (such as when Isabel and Abby meet Selwyn Sainsbury. And then there are other scenes that I wanted to be longer, to be explored, to get an inner depth (such as when Edward is diagnosed with his illness and struggles to come to terms with it). Yet overall I thought there was too much crammed in. And I felt as though the author realised this as the phrase, ‘weeks flew by’, time flew by,’ etc. was constantly reiterated. I was just getting into a certain part of the plot when, as a reader I was forced to follow another storyline. Sometimes I felt that parts of the novel read as a synopsis.

Told from an omniscient third party point of view, it was interesting to see the viewpoints of the main characters Isabel and Edward with the odd chapters designated to the children, Frank, Phoebe, and Abby.

Although the frustrations that both Isabel and Edward struggle with is revealed in the inner dialogue of both, I wanted more from both of them; Edward’s fear as a man terminally ill, Isabel’s worry about how she would cope without him as a person, rather than cheerfully planning which part of Eleanor and Selwyn Sainsbury’s house she would live in.
I did feel that, sometimes, the dialogue of all the characters was quite stilted and there was often a hint of an American vernacular. But my main problem with the dialogue was with that of the youngest daughter, Abby. At the beginning of the book it was stated she was three but soon became five (and I re-read this part because I thought I’d missed time moving on – but no). Even so, either age, she spoke more as an adult than a child and this both irritated and made her unbelievable.

So … my final thoughts
This is a wonderful story but it feels rushed. There is far more to be explored with all the characters to give them all depth, to give them backgrounds that show the reader why they act as they do. To my mind it’s at least two books, maybe even a trilogy. There is certainly enough action and plot to take it over more than one book

The book would be stronger if more evenly paced

Perhaps another edit would iron out some of the minor formatting, repetition, grammar and punctuation problems?

And, lastly, I wasn’t keen on the title, Broken Wings. The phrase wasn’t brought in until the end of the story. The strength of this plot deserves a stronger title. But this might be me … I might have missed something.

Anyway, give it a try; I’d be interested to see what other readers think.

This book is available on:

Amazon.co.uk: http://amzn.to/1K5TWdl

Amazon.com: http://amzn.to/1MQwt5X