Honoured to be included in a Post Written by Thorne Moore (Alongside Jane Austen No Less!!)

Thorny matters

Home, Hearth and Murder – domestic drama

Back in 1816, Jane Austen (yes, I always try to bring her into anything if I can) commiserated with her nephew when he reported that he had lost 2 whole chapters of his own tentative novel. She hadn’t stolen them, she promised. “What should I do with your strong, manly, spirited Sketches, full of Variety & Glow? — How could I possibly join them on to the little bit (two Inches wide) of Ivory on which I work with so fine a Brush, as produces little effect after much labour?”

Being Jane Austen, she was, of course, being ironic, suggesting that her own writing was on such a slight and insignificant scale. Sir Walter Scott recognised that her work was fair more powerful than a little bit of ivory would allow. “The big bow-wow strain I can do myself like any now going; but the exquisite touch, which renders ordinary commonplace things and characters interesting, from the truth of the description and the sentiment, is denied to me.”

And yet critics have dared to complain that Austen’s novels are too limited, confined to “three or four families in a country village,” when all around her, the social upheaval of the industrial revolution, the French Terror, the Napoleonic wars were playing out. She knew well enough what great dramas were happening out there. A cousin’s husband was guillotined, an aunt was hauled off to prison, two brothers were serving in the navy, and yet she chose to concentrate on a small group of people interacting on a tiny stage as if the outside world didn’t exist. But what Jane Austen appreciated was that there is just as much emotional and psychological drama to be found in closed families as on wide battlefields.

I write about crime. My genre has been defined as Domestic Noir and it always focuses on the dark dynamics at work within a family, a neighbourhood, a close circle of friends. Does that mean it lacks the drama of a crime novel set, say, among Columbian drug barons, or the Mafia, or human traffickers or crooked financiers in the city? It probably lacks the extreme gore of a hard-boiled thriller. I work on the assumption that lashing out wildly and causing a loved one’s death with a misplaced blow is just as tragic and dramatic as a gruesome plot involving a victim’s head being chewed off by a bear.

Domestic drama might lack the fast pace of mainstream crime fiction too. It tends to be a matter of a slow burn, rising gradually to a rolling boil, scalding oil and an all-consuming blaze. That’s what I like, because it is what goes on in families – and with isolating lock-down, even more so. You don’t have to look to the scheming world of international crime or the grimy nastiness of the underworld to discover every facet of human emotion – thundering passion, consuming rage, seething jealousy, love, hope, disappointment, despair, joy, triumph, resentment, remorse. They are all there, simmering behind lace curtains.

Judith Barrow’s latest book, The Memory, proves the point exactly. Following the story of Irene from young girl greeting the birth of her beloved Downs Syndrome sister to aging carer of a mother with dementia, it is an exquisite study of how family ties and stresses stir up every possible joy and anguish from deep protective love to long-nursed hatred, with sheer bloody exhaustion nudging inexorably towards a fatal brink.

Read it and tell me a domestic drama can’t shake the reader as much as a shoot-out in bank vaults or torture in a cellar.

The Memory by Judith Barrow

www.thornemoore.co.uk

11 thoughts on “Honoured to be included in a Post Written by Thorne Moore (Alongside Jane Austen No Less!!)

  1. My thoughts chime completely with this. Jane Austen’s characters are so finely drawn that the tension between them, driven by human emotion, makes for gripping reading. Judith Barrow’s The Memory does this, too. Irene reacts to the situations around her in ways that we can all identify with and we’re drawn along with her to the stunning conclusion.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I’ve been meaning to download this one for some time, Judith, and am glad I saw this post today. (With my reduced social media activity right now, I often miss things I wish I hadn’t.) So, after reading this beautiful post and your conversation with my lovely friend, Trish, I went straight over to Amazon and grabbed my copy. I’m not sure when I’ll be able to read it, but I WILL, and I feel sure I’ll enjoy it.

    I, too, write about families and smaller-scale drama, whether in the Wake-Robin Ridge series, accompanied by a bit of mild paranormal stuff, or in the Riverbend one, merely accompanied by some eccentric and/or downright weird locals. And I enjoy reading about the human condition, no matter what’s going on in the world beyond. Looking forward to this book! 🙂 ❤

    Like

    • Oh, how lovely to hear from you, Marcia, I feel we lost touch, although Trish does keep me up to date with your activities and books. It seems so a long time since I read the Wake-Robin Ridge series – and loving them!! I too, miss so much on social media; it gets overwhelming at times and I need to back off. But brilliant of you to drop by here. And thank you for ordering The Memory; I do hope you enjoy the book. ❤ ❤

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s