My Review of A Mind To Kill  by John Nicholl

A Mind To Kill: A dark psychological thriller packed with suspense by [Nicholl, John]

Book Description:

When Rebecca’s childhood abuser escapes justice, it sets her on a path to revenge, revenge on any man who preys on the innocent.

Twenty-three-year-old Rebecca poses as a child online and sets her trap, luring one sexual predator after another to their deaths. 

When a severed head and other body parts are found washed up on a windswept estuary beach, the police begin their investigation.

If you’re looking for a page-turning book you won’t be able to put down, discover John Nicholl’s stunning new thriller today. 

My Review:

I received an ARC of A Mind To Kill  from the author in return for an honest review. 

This is a deeply disturbing book that deals with child abuse, murder and gruesome scenes. I’ve read and reviewed books by John Nicholl before: Bully Boy Blue  and Portraits of the Dead. Both dark, gripping stories where the author shows his knowledge of police matters and certain kinds of crimes.  For me A Mind To Kill is his most grim yet. It is obvious from the book blurb that it will be macabre in parts; readers are warned. There are graphic scenes that some may want to skim through. But it has to be borne in mind that these have a reason to be there; for revenge against one of the most horrific and vile crimes; child abuse.

That said I will review as usual.

 In the author’s previous books there has always been one character, the protagonist that I have felt some empathy for, some understanding of their actions and their mindset.  I was disappointed that I didn’t have this choice in  A Mind To Kill . Although I grasped the anger and passion for revenge that drives Rebecca, and recognised what happened to her in childhood has coloured her whole outlook on life, for me it is too one dimensional. I would have liked much more background of her previous life inserted somewhere; if only glimpses of her childhood after the abuse, her teenage years. Something that brought her to this point in her life which explains her relationship with her mother especially. I would have liked to have a flashback or two to see where the justice system failed this family and the emotions that the ordinary police must have felt. (I do like flashbacks!)

And, having met Inspector Gravell (Grav) in a previous book, I was disappointed in the change in him. I know, having lost his fellow partner, Detective Sergeant Clive Rankin, he would be a more embittered and cynical character but he is portrayed  as a completely unpleasant man in this book. His previous bluff yet compassionate side is well hidden.

Mostly the dialogue is realistic and plausible and differentiates the characters but every now and then, especially in the conversations between Rebecca and her mother I found it difficult to realise who was speaking. And, in other parts of the book, there is what I call ‘head hopping’ between characters. The spoken and internal dialogue between  characters jumps from the point of view of one of the characters, usually one of the two main characters to the mind of someone else, sometimes even a minor, flat character who adds little to the main plot or only appears once in a short side plot. 

Beyond an internal setting of one room, graphically and frighteningly described, there are few external settings, But these are well written and give a strong sense of place.

A Mind To Kill  is an extremely dark psychological thriller; the strong emotions, the vengeance, the hatred, the evil radiates throughout the story . The boundaries of right and wrong blend and become difficult to  identify with. It’s a book that is both contentious and provocative. I would recommend it for readers who understand that there is true evil in the underworld of vile child abuse… and have a strong stomach.

Links;

Amazon.co.uk: http://amzn.to/2v1hALh

Amazon.com: http://amzn.to/2tLDB16

My Series of Author & Poet Interviews at Narberth Book Fair #MondayBlogs. Today with Angela Fish

Throughout these last two months I ’ve be posting interviews with the authors and poets who will be taking part in our Book Fair:  http://www.narberthbookfair.co.uk/.

There are forty authors, so, obviously, there are many genres for both adults and children. There will be talks an writing and books, creative writing workshops for adults  workshops & talks and fun workshops for children, activities for the children  Children’s Page and a fun book trail through Narberth, the gorgeous little market town in Pembrokeshire.  Location.

All free!!

And, of course, there will be the chance to chat with all the authors and to pick their brains on all aspects of writing. Even to buy their books and have them personally signed.

And, as usual, there will also be the writing competition: this year is a poetry competition:  competition . Submit a poem, in any form, of 20 lines or less, on the subject of : –

BOOKS AND READING.

Having outgrown our previous venue we have been lucky to hire the Queens Hall: https://www.thequeenshall.org.uk/ who have been very generous in their support of the event.

Although, five years ago,  I started organising the book fairs on my own I was soon joined by Alex Martin: http://amzn.to/2hZCgt2  and Thorne Moore: http://bit.ly/2rc5qyA. Unfortunately Alex has moved on to pastures new  (although is still a great supporter), so Thorne and I have been joined by Elizabeth Sleight. Elizabeth is involved in the charity we are supporting through our raffle; The Harriet Davis Seaside Holiday Trust For Disabled Children: http://bit.ly/2sNyeKQ . 

Our last author to be interviewed got the Narberth Book Fair is children’s writer, Angela Fish

 

Angela Fish

Tell us, please,Angela, have you always wanted to be an author?

I’ve always wanted to write, but for a long time there was no specific genre that I wanted to pursue. I guess I haven’t changed much, although I find myself drawn to fiction writing more and more these days.

What do you love most about the writing process?

 I love the freedom of the imagination in creating magical characters (for the children’s work), settings or plot lines.  That moment, when a niggling thought becomes a semi-formed idea, which then morphs into a plot, is fabulous. 

Do you have any writing rituals?

Not specifically. I don’t write every day, but I do try to engage with the story/ characters/plot line. For example, I often talk to my characters, or even role-play, so that I can develop them a little more – get into their skin, if you like. It also helps with dialogue.

Are your characters based on real people or did they all come entirely from your imagination?

Probably a mix of the two. I don’t consciously think that I’ll base a character on someone I know, or have known, but there are obviously certain character traits that simply beg to be used!

 What genre do you consider your books? Have you considered writing in another genre?

I have been writing for children as the ‘Ben’ series was the first that was accepted for publication (apart from individual poems), so that was the route I followed, but I love to explore all aspects of writing. I have experimented with YA/Sci/fantasy but at the moment I’m working on an adult novel, The Snow Globe, which is considerably different from my previous work!

What gives you inspiration for your books?

For the children’s books, it’s been my love of nature and the environment, plus my continued interest in mythology and magic. The starting point for the ‘Ben’ books was story cubes. I also find them useful if I’m stuck midway with a piece of writing as they can suggest which direction to take. As for other work – inspiration can strike anytime or anywhere! Overheard conversations; fellow passengers; quirky advertising or unusual sayings or phrases.Could you tell us a bit about your most recent book?

I had to write a very short pitch for the adult novel recently, and came up with this:
Three generations, three decades, and six lives that criss-cross or run parallel, but all connected and affected by the welfare system, addiction, deceit, coercion, loss, betrayal, friendship or hope. They try to move on or seek answers, but no-one knows the whole truth. The snow globe is the only link that can unravel their stories. 

How many books have you written. Which is your favourite?

I’ve had three books published – the ‘Ben’ series, and I’m currently negotiating the publication of two picture books. One is a pirate story and the other is a non-fiction based on the five senses. I have another completed picture book and an unfinished book of stories about a banana! I tend to go back to these works when I need a break from the two lengthier stories I’m working on (see below). I also have a part-worked adult novel based on a story from my family history research, but that’s proving difficult so is ‘shelved’ for the time being. I think that the third book in the ‘Ben’ series, Ben and the Spider Lake, is probably my favourite at the moment, as I feel I had more understanding of my characters, and the plot structure seemed to work better as well.

gateLake

Do you hear from your readers much? What kinds of things do they say? What has been the best compliment?

I have feedback and letters from some of the young people that I’ve visited in schools, plus the reviews that have been posted from complete strangers!
Some examples:  ‘This spellbinding tale(The Spider Prince) will captivate young children between five and eight years old …  The story is a clever blend of fantasy and contemporary realism as the action moves between the two very different worlds…’  [New Welsh Reader, Issue 111, Fo Orbell, Freelance Picture Researcher and Writer. Researcher for Oxford University Press]

From schools:

‘Your books are always exciting with lots of information about your characters. Ben and the Spider Prince has amazingly creative twists and turns with lots of astonishing scenes and pages.

‘I would love you to write even more and more fascinating imaginative stories.’

I was also invited to do a live interview on the Roy Noble Show, on BBC Radio Wales. Great experience and really good fun.

If you could spend time with a character from your book who would it be? And what would you do during that day?

I think it would have to be Amara, the wise woman in Ben and the Spider Lake. She lives in an unusual cave in the high mountains next to Spider Lake. She can communicate with the birds and other animals and know how create spells and use magic wisely. I think I’d enjoy having her show me the ancient Rowan tree next to her cave, and I’d also like to see the peacocks and meet Hiboo, the white owl.

Do you have any hidden or uncommon talents?

Interesting question! I’ve been told that I have green fingers – not sure if that counts?

What would you say is your interesting writing quirk?

Not sure if it’s interesting, but as I said earlier, I like to talk to my characters. Sometimes I play the different parts and interact with them.

What do you like to do when you’re not writing?

Reading, gardening, meeting family and friends, family history research, playing with the cat, doing crosswords.

What is the most amusing thing that has ever happened to you? Not particularly to do with your writing?

I was running a training course in north Wales, which meant an overnight stay. In the morning, I realised that I had packed two left shoes (similar styles) so had to wear my old boots instead. My colleague joked that if I had just packed a pair of two different shoes, then I could have worn them to see if any of the group noticed and/or commented!

Give us a random fact about yourself.

My blood is on the portcullis of Castell Coch, in Tongwynlais! I grew up in the village and we often played in the castle grounds. When I was seven, I ran up the drawbridge and fell. My head connected with the gate with subsequent blood-letting.

Angela’s Links

Website
Facebook

Smorgasbord Reblog – The other Inconspicuous form of Bullying – Emotional Bullying

A post worth sharing from Debby & Sally.

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

This is an important post from Debby Gies about the often subtle but deadly form of bullying.. Emotional manipulation can be devastating and some times you can be unaware that someone is actually taking their own inadequacies out on you.

We’ve all heard stories about bullying, It happens in homes, schools, and on the internet. But what about a form of bullying in our every day lives we may be experiencing ? Often these symptoms aren’t recognized or more often, not even considered a form of bullying.

This often deceptive hidden form of bullying can occur through the way some people interact with friends or loved ones. When people talk down to others, making them feel insignificant, threatened or forced to abide by what is being directed at them, that is bullying.

Is there anyone in your life that responds to a heartfelt request from you with assertion or aggression…

View original post 305 more words

My Series of Authors & Poets Interviews #author #poet Narberth Book Fair#BookFair. Today with Sharon Tregenza #MondayBlogs

Titleband for Narberth Book Fair

Throughout this months I ’ll be posting interviews with the authors and poets who will be taking part in our Book Fair:  http://www.narberthbookfair.co.uk/.

There are forty authors, so, obviously, there are many genres for both adults and children. There will be talks an writing and books, creative writing workshops for adults  workshops & talks and fun workshops for children, activities for the children  Children’s Page and a fun book trail through Narberth, the gorgeous little market town in Pembrokeshire.  Location.

All free!!

And, of course, there will be the chance to chat with all the authors and to pick their brains on all aspects of writing. Even to buy their books and have them personally signed.

And, as usual, there will also be the writing competition: this year is a poetry competition:  competition . Submit a poem, in any form, of 20 lines or less, on the subject of : –

BOOKS AND READING.

Having outgrown our previous venue we have been lucky to hire the Queens Hall: https://www.thequeenshall.org.uk/ who have been very generous in their support of the event.

Although, five years ago,  I started organising the book fairs on my own I was soon joined by Alex Martin: http://amzn.to/2hZCgt2  and Thorne Moore: http://bit.ly/2rc5qyA. Unfortunately Alex has moved on to pastures new  (although is still a great supporter), so Thorne and I have been joined by Elizabeth Sleight. Elizabeth is involved in the charity we are supporting through our raffle; The Harriet Davis Seaside Holiday Trust For Disabled Children: http://bit.ly/2sNyeKQ . 

Our author today is my great friend and children’s writer, Sharon Tregenza

Sharon Tregenza

Tell us, Sharon, why do you write?

I don’t know what I’d do with myself if I didn’t write, I’ve been doing it for so long now.

What book that you have read has most influenced your life?

I can’t honestly say there’s been a book that has influenced my life – that sounds a bit grand. There have been a few books that may have influenced my writing.

If you could have been the author of any book ever written, which book would you choose?

‘Holes’ by Louis Sacher. It’s a master class in layering and stitching together bits of myth and magic to create a fascinating whole.

Do you have any writing rituals?

I get something to physically embody the story. For instance, I’m writing another children’s mystery – this time about the trapping of songbirds so I bought myself a pretty glass greenfinch to hang in my study.

What is your work schedule like when you’re writing?

Work schedule? Ha. Haha. Hahaha. 

Stop laughing, Hahahaha…  I’m only asking the questions!! 

Tarantula Tide 2008 (Kelpies)

 How many books have you written? Which is your favourite?

I’ve written five. Three are published one seems to be going by the wayside and the fifth I’m tweaking now. My favourite? Probably ‘The Jewelled Jaguar’ as it’s the most recently published.

What genre do you consider your books? Have you considered writing in another genre?

My books are for Middle Grade (8-12). I’m working on a couple of picture books though and if I chose another genre it would be cosy murders – you know, Miss Marple kind of thing. They seem like they’d be fun to write.

 In three words, can you describe your latest book?

Children’s – adventure – mystery.

What is your favourite part of the book?

The ending. I’ve must have read and rewritten it umpteen times but it still makes me well up. How sad is that. Haha.

If you could spend time with a character from your book who would it be? And what would you do during that day?

I’d spend time with Rhodri Tudor because he’s a dude. He’s smart and kind and funny and plays folk guitar.

Do you hear from your readers much? What kinds of things do they say?

I do. Because they’re kids they say the sweetest things and it always lifts my heart. They’re the harshest critics too mind. You don’t want to short change them, trust me. 

The Shiver Stone

 Do you have any hidden or uncommon talents?

If they’re hidden it’s because I want ‘em to stay that way.  😉

What would you say is your interesting writing quirk?

I like to secretly connect words or characters in some way just for my own entertainment. Often I don’t mention the connections to anyone. For instance in the book I’m working on now (which will be called The Black Peacock) I’ve given all the characters names related to birds (Damn – I’ve told you that secret now. J)

 What do you like to do when you’re not writing?

Socialise (preferably with wine) read and listen to stories, exercise.

What is the most amusing thing that has ever happened to you? Not particularly to do with your writing?

Oh, good grief. How long have you got? If I had to pick one quickly it might be when I visited Egyptian friends in Cairo and was given a bowl of melted ice cream as the Muezzin called the faithful to prayer from the Minaret outside and Benny Hill blasted out of their TV set.

 Give us a random fact about yourself.

I LOVE quirky properties. I’ve lived in part of a church, an old Mill House and am now in a converted chapel. I’m about to downsize so who knows what’s next? Windmill?

 Sharon’s Links:

 website
Facebook
Twitter

 

 

My Fifth Saturday Round-Up Of All the Brilliant Authors #authors & Poets #poets at the Narberth Book Fair #BookFair

Titleband for Narberth Book FairGathering even more of us all together this week to show what a treat is in store at our book fair. Do please drop in to our website:   Narberth Book Fair, cleverly put together by the brilliant Thorne Moore.

Will be posting interviews with the authors and poets who will be taking part in our Book Fair for some weeks to come.

There are forty authors, obviously, there are many genres for both adults and children. There will be talks an writing and books, creative writing workshops for adults: workshops & talks and fun workshops for children, activities for the children; Children’s Page and a fun book trail through Narberth, the gorgeous little market town in Pembrokeshire. Location.

All free!!

And, of course, there will be the chance to chat with all the authors and to pick their brains on all aspects of writing. Even to buy their books and have them personally signed.

And, as usual, there will also be the writing competition: this year is a poetry competition: competition Submit a poem, in any form, of 20 lines or less, on the subject of : –

BOOKS AND READING.

Having outgrown our previous venue we have been lucky to hire the Queens Hall: https://www.thequeenshall.org.uk/ who have been very generous in their support of the event.

Although, five years ago,  I started organising the book fairs on my own I was soon joined by Alex Martin: http://amzn.to/2hZCgt2  and Thorne Moore: http://bit.ly/2rc5qyA. Unfortunately Alex has moved on to pastures new  (although is still a great supporter and, hopefully, will be with us at the fair), so Thorne and I have been joined by Elizabeth Sleight. Elizabeth is involved in the charity we are supporting through our raffle; The Harriet Davis Seaside Holiday Trust For Disabled Children: http://bit.ly/2sNyeKQ . 

The line up so far:

Judith Barrow

Thorne Moore

Juliet Greenwood

Graham Watkins

Rebecca Bryn

Helen Williams

Sally Spedding

Katy Whateva

Sara Gethin

Cheryl Rees-Price

Jackie Biggs

Judith Arnopp

Colin R Parsons

Kate Murray

Hugh Roberts

Carol Lovekin

Catherine Marshall

Tracey Warr

Steve Thorpe

Wendy Steele

Sally’s Cafe and Bookstore – Author Update – Kristina Stanley, D.G. Kaye and Judith Barrow

So grateful to Sally Cronin for this lovely surprise addition to her post. As you will all know (and if you don’t where have you been!!) Sally is an invaluable supporter of authors, poets, artists, musicians. I’m honoured today to be part of this eclectic mix.

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

Welcome to the Friday Cafe and Bookstore Update and we kick things off with news of the next book by Kristina Stanley to be released on August 1st – Look the Other Way.

About Look the Other Way

Submerged beneath the depths is a sea of secrets

A year after her Uncle Bobby mysteriously disappears in the turquoise waters surrounding the Bahamas, Shannon Payne joins her grieving aunt to trace Bobby’s last voyage. Shannon hopes the serenity of the sea might help her recover from a devastating breakup with her fiancé.

Sailing the 38-foot catamaran, A Dog’s Cat, is Captain Jake Hunter, a disillusioned cop who has sworn off women. While Shannon tries to resist her growing attraction to the rugged captain, she uncovers dark truths about her uncle’s death that might send them all to the depths.

What some of the advance readers are saying about the book

View original post 1,263 more words

My Series of Author & Poet Interviews #author #poet Narberth Book Fair#BookFair. Today with Wendy Steele

Titleband for Narberth Book Fair

Throughout this months I ’ll be posting interviews with the authors and poets who will be taking part in our Book Fair:  http://www.narberthbookfair.co.uk/.

There are forty authors, so, obviously, there are many genres for both adults and children. There will be talks an writing and books, creative writing workshops for adults  workshops & talks and fun workshops for children, activities for the children  Children’s Page and a fun book trail through Narberth, the gorgeous little market town in Pembrokeshire.  Location.

All free!!

And, of course, there will be the chance to chat with all the authors and to pick their brains on all aspects of writing. Even to buy their books and have them personally signed.

And, as usual, there will also be the writing competition: this year is a poetry competition:  competition . Submit a poem, in any form, of 20 lines or less, on the subject of : –

BOOKS AND READING.

Having outgrown our previous venue we have been lucky to hire the Queens Hall: https://www.thequeenshall.org.uk/ who have been very generous in their support of the event.

Although, five years ago,  I started organising the book fairs on my own I was soon joined by Alex Martin: http://amzn.to/2hZCgt2  and Thorne Moore: http://bit.ly/2rc5qyA. Unfortunately Alex has moved on to pastures new  (although is still a great supporter), so Thorne and I have been joined by Elizabeth Sleight. Elizabeth is involved in the charity we are supporting through our raffle; The Harriet Davis Seaside Holiday Trust For Disabled Children: http://bit.ly/2sNyeKQ . 

Our author today is the multi-talented Wendy Steel

 

Wendy Steele

 

What do you love most about the writing process?

I love seeing my characters play out a story that’s been banging around in my head, watching it evolve and develop, often from a single idea. I enjoy editing and finishing less but the joy of completing a draft ready for first readers, makes up for that. Of course, feedback from readers is the greatest joy of all.

What book that you have read has most influenced your life?

I was forty years of age when I read Moon Magic by Dion Fortune. My childhood love of the moon and everything Egyptian and my personal discoveries about paganism, hedge witchery and the Kabbalah were brought together when I read that book. With new confidence, I wrote my first published novel, Destiny of Angels.

Who is your favourite author?

My favourite author is the late, much missed, Sir Terry Pratchett. I read Wyrd Sisters first before devouring every book he had written. I’m a visual reader and writer and Sir Terry conjures up images and scenes in the most beautiful and economical way. His use of language can make me laugh or cry. Magic.

DestinyWrath

 

 

What is your work schedule like when you’re writing?

An average week will include 16-18 hours of writing plus 7-12 hours of social media/marketing.

I love big chunks of time to write, to immerse myself in the story and characters. My best writing time is if my partner is working away and I don’t need to teach in the evening. I’m happy to write for 12-14 hours in one hit.

The reality is that I rarely get 4 hours at a time but I carry chapters of first draft with me, in case I have the opportunity to read and revise and make notes for the following chapters. Typing them up involves me in the story quickly, often leading to me writing on; I’ll do anything to maximise my writing time.

 

The Standing Stone - The GatheringThe Standing Stone - Silence Is BrokenThe Standing Stone - Home For Christmas

Could you tell us a bit about your most recent book and why it is a must-read?

The Naked Witch is my first novel in a new and exciting genre, Witchlit. Similar to Chicklit, the female protagonist is a modern woman, juggling work, an ex-husband, a difficult, demanding mother while also the responsible single parent of a teenage daughter. Readers love Lizzie Martin! She’s a woman of courage, beset by the worries and concerns we have but determined to stand up for what she believes in. Being a witch is part of who she is, rather than the label that defines her.

In three words, can you describe your latest book?

Compelling, thought-provoking and unique.

the naked witch KINDLE(1)

 

What was the inspiration behind The Naked Witch?

I wanted to write a book for everyone, especially women, whatever their usual choice of genre. Lizzie lives her life in a man’s world, as do we all and I wanted to write a story about a woman making her own rules, willing to defy convention and be successful in her own right.

How long did it take you to write The Naked Witch?

Having penned a few Witchlit short stories at the end of last year, the character of Lizzie Martin emerged and her story unfolded easily. The book took me three months to write and a further month to edit once I’d had feedback from first readers.

When did you write your first book and how old were you?

I wrote a few children’s books about Willoughby the Hedgehog in my twenties but I was thirty eight when I began my first novel, Hubble Bubble…and forty one when I finished it! I wrote in forty minute time slots while sitting in the car, waiting for my children to come out of school.

Do you hear from your readers much? What kinds of things do they say?

I’ve had useful and encouraging feedback from readers in reviews but I also get messages and meet fans at book fairs. I’m delighted to say they find my books inspiring, feeling they can identify with the characters…and more than one of them wants to be Lizzie Martin!

Do you have any hidden or uncommon talents?

I’m not sure if it’s a talent but I can recite the alphabet backwards. I taught myself at the age of about twelve…I have no idea why. I learned to read music, when I learned to play the piano, at the age of four, the same age as when I learned to read words.

What would you say is your interesting writing quirk?

When I lived in a town, I used to have writing trousers, a huge, baggy pair of black tracksuit bottoms which was my preferred attire to write in. Now I write in pjs.

I love beginning a new story with a fresh pad of A4 paper and my Waterman fountain pen.

What do you like to do when you’re not writing?

Apart from renovating my current residence and attempting to tame four acres of land, I dance. I learned belly dance from the age of forty, taught it for four years and, while exploring other dance genres, discovered ATS® Belly dance. I’ve been teaching this style as Tribal Unity Wales since March 2014. Belly dance is a fabulous, full body work out and classes are a great way to make friends and keep fit.

Smiles

What is the most amusing thing that has ever happened to you? Not particularly to do with your writing

I can only recall one incident that was amusing to those watching while embarrassing for me at the time…five months pregnant with my daughter, I fell through a garden chair and got stuck…even I laughed as my friends attempted to extract me!

Give us a random fact about yourself.

Belly dance gave me confidence at a time when I was coping with a debilitating illness and struggling with self image. I wanted a tattoo but money was put to more practical use, bringing up three children so at the age of fifty, ten years later, I had my first tattoo, a delicate triskele that I adore. The eight pointed star of the warrior goddess Ishtar soon followed. Last year, I asked the fabulously talented Abi Hack to design a tribal band for my arm, incorporating a thirteen petalled lotus and a mandala that my daughter and I share, both of which adorn my right arm.

 Wendy’s Links:
Website
Facebook
Twitter
Linkedin
Amazon author page
Good Reads
The Phoenix and the Dragon